CalARP / Risk Management Plans

The California Accidental Release Program (CalARP) is the Federal Risk Management Program established by the USEPA (CFR, Title 40, Part 68), with additional requirements specific to California. The CalARP Program was established to prevent accidental releases of substances that pose the greatest risk of immediate harm, to the public and the environment.

A CalARP facility is a facility that handles, manufactures, uses, or stores any of the listed regulated substances found in tables 1-3 of the California Code of Regulations, Title 19 Division 2, Chapter 4.5 above threshold quantities. Some examples of regulated substances include Ammonia, Chlorine gas Hydrochloric acid, Nitric acid, and Propane.

Risk Management Plan (RMP) Businesses must develop a plan to handle an accidental release. This plan is called a Risk Management Plan. An RMP is required when a facility uses a regulated substance in excess of the CalARP threshold quantity. An RMP must be completed and submitted to the Glenn County Air Pollution Control District (GCAPCD), the Administering Agency for the CalARP Program, in accordance with the California Health and Safety Code, Division 20, Chapter 6.95, Article 2 and the California Code of Regulation (CCR) Title 19 Division 2, Chapter 4.5, Articles 1 through 11.The RMP summarizes the facility’s accidental release prevention program implementation activities, including: Maintenance, Hazard Review, Operating Procedures, Training, Offsite Consequence Analysis, Incident Investigation, Emergency Response Program, and Compliance Audit.

5-Year Update The RMP needs to be updated at least once every five years from the date of its initial submission. The owner or operator is required to: Review all nine sections of the RMP. Update the RMP as appropriate. Certify that the entire updated RMP is true, accurate, and complete. Submit the updated RMP to GCAPCD by the facility’s 5-year update due date.

Cal ARP General Forms

Cal ARP Registration Form